The English Challenge Page for:
June 2005


Go to the Current Months' English Challenge Page

Click here to go to the Main Students' Page.

This page is for advanced ESL English students who want to be challenged!

Every week I post an advanced English lesson on this page. These lessons are intended to be very difficult and challenging. Even the most advanced English as Second Language (ESL) students may find these lessons difficult.


( Jump to the challenge for the week of June 11 )
( Jump to the challenge for the week of June 04 )


English Challenge for the week of June 18, 2005

Making sense of the words ambassador, commissioner, elite, and mediocrity.

Click below to start the lesson in Full-Screen mode:
Click below to start the lesson in Half-Screen mode:


This week's lesson focuses on four nouns. Two of them deal with official titles for people while the other two describe people's abilities. This should be a fun lesson, and you will even take on the role as a Police Officer! I will give you one hint; mediocrity does not mean something that is average. Many native speakers use the work incorrectly and use mediocrity to describe something that is average; this is not the correct meaning of the word!



English Challenge for the week of June 11, 2005

Learn the words: nincompoop, hooligan, nonsense and predator.

Click below to start the lesson in Full-Screen mode:
Click below to start the lesson in Half-Screen mode:


This week English lesson was designed to be fun. You may get a chuckle from some of the dialog in this lesson. There is even a mystery voice included in the dialog! However, as usual the lesson will be difficult. It focuses on words that are often used to disapprove of something or somebody.




English Challenge for the week of June 04, 2005

Using the words systematic, and proclaim.

Click below to start the lesson in Full-Screen mode:
Click below to start the lesson in Half-Screen mode:


This week we only look at two words. However, the lesson contains some very long dialogs for you to figure out. It is worth to note that native English speakers sometimes misuse both of the words featured in this week's lesson.